The Daily Illini https://dailyillini.com The independent student newspaper at the University of Illinois since 1871 Sun, 01 Sep 2019 15:37:49 -0500 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.2 Start your Monday morning with your Weekly Illini: your roundup of University of Illinois news. This is a Daily Illini podcast. The Daily Illini clean episodic The Daily Illini social@dailyillini.com social@dailyillini.com (The Daily Illini) University of Illinois The Daily Illini https://dailyillini.com/wp-content/uploads/powerpress/Podcasts-02-094.png https://dailyillini.com The Illini’s first win receives quality grades https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/09/01/the-illinis-first-win-receives-quality-grades/ https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/09/01/the-illinis-first-win-receives-quality-grades/#respond Sun, 01 Sep 2019 15:37:49 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216356 After much anticipation, the 2019 Illinois football team finally took the field Saturday, hosting Akron. Although the competition wasn’t the most challenging, head coach Lovie Smith’s team took care of business in convincing fashion, rolling to a 42-3 victory. For the Illini offense, the execution wasn’t always spot-on, but the gap in talent proved too...

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After much anticipation, the 2019 Illinois football team finally took the field Saturday, hosting Akron. Although the competition wasn’t the most challenging, head coach Lovie Smith’s team took care of business in convincing fashion, rolling to a 42-3 victory. For the Illini offense, the execution wasn’t always spot-on, but the gap in talent proved too much for the Zips regardless. Defensively, Illinois completely shut down an albeit poor Akron offense, but the performance featured multiple standout individual performances nonetheless.

Offense: B+

42 points are about as good a start as the Illini could have hoped for. Transfer quarterback Brandon Peters took care of the football, each of the Illini’s standout running backs got positive touches and the new additions at receiver made their mark.

The offense came out of the gate humming, and Peters led them down the field on a 63-yard drive capped off by a 9-yard touchdown pass to senior tight end Justice Williams.

“It was a good momentum swing,” Peters said. “Just to start off strong and get in the endzone, really prove a point that that’s what we’re gonna do all day.”

It was a welcome sight for Smith to see Mike Epstein back on the field after an injury ended his 2018 season abruptly. The junior ran for 45 yards on 8 carries, but he did leave the game with an unspecified injury.

 “We’re a running football team,” Smith said. “Of course (for) Mike Epstein it was good to get him back out there. We spread the ball around.”

Elsewhere in the backfield, standout senior Reggie Corbin ran for 36 yards and a touchdown but was removed after the first quarter due to picking up a minor injury according to Smith. Junior Ra’Von Bonner added 38 yards and a touchdown, while Peters himself tallied 41 yards and an elusive touchdown run as the Illini ran for 219 yards and three touchdowns overall.

Brandon Peters: B

Peters covered the basics to be successful as a quarterback; he took care of the football, and he avoided sacks as best he could (taking just one).

“That’s what we’ve seen from (Peters), under control, making good decisions,” Smith said. “I thought he made great decisions out there, timely runs also.”

Indeed Peters was better than advertised in terms of rushing as he picked up chunk plays and even found the endzone, darting through the path his blockers opened up for him from 20 yards out.

While his timing with the receivers was not in harmony yet, he still tossed three touchdowns, including one to USC transfer Trevon Sidney. Sidney and fellow Trojan transfer Josh Imatorbhebhe totaled 60 yards receiving combined. Fall camp standout Daniel Barker also notched a touchdown reception, proving that his strong camp performance was a sign of things to come.

Defense: A-

Giving up just three points and taking the ball away twice is about as good as it gets. For a unit that was among the worst in the country a season ago, it was a welcome sight.

“Offense has played good football for (a) long period of time, defense needed to step up and I thought they did,” Smith said. “Not pleased with the first drive, (Akron) had a couple of big plays in there. After that first series, took care of business, played the run well.”

Junior Jake Hansen led the way with a forced fumble, a recovery, an interception, a half-sack and seven tackles.

While the unit underperformed to say the least in 2018, Lovie Smith is a defensive-specialized coach and wanted to make forcing turnovers a priority as he took over as the team’s defensive coordinator this offseason.

“That’s Coach Smith ball right there,” Hansen said. “Getting after the ball and getting takeaways that’s what we pride ourselves on.”

USC transfer Oluwole Betiku added 1.5 sacks and he was not alone as Tymir Oliver, Owen Carney, Lere Oladipo and Ayo Shogbonyo also joined in on the sack parade.

Additionally, Washington transfer linebacker Milo Eifler added a huge hit that caused Akron’s Michael Mathison to leave the game.

“Talked a lot about Milo Eifler and the type of impact player he can be. That’s about as good of a hit as you’ll see from a linebacker,” Smith said.

Though the season is far from over, the Illini had about as good a start as they could have hoped for. Next week, Illinois heads on the road to take on UCONN, which had one of the worst programs in the FBS a season ago.

milesp2@dailyillini.com

@MilesP_H

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Customer service workers deserve appreciation https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/31/customer-service-workers-deserve-appreciation/ https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/31/customer-service-workers-deserve-appreciation/#respond Sat, 31 Aug 2019 16:00:16 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216175 People always say “seeing is believing” to essentially sum up the idea that you don’t really know what it’s like for someone until you step into their shoes. It’s appropriate to extend this line of thinking to the field of customer service.  Until you’ve worked in customer service yourself, it’s all too easy to overlook...

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People always say “seeing is believing” to essentially sum up the idea that you don’t really know what it’s like for someone until you step into their shoes. It’s appropriate to extend this line of thinking to the field of customer service. 

Until you’ve worked in customer service yourself, it’s all too easy to overlook how stressful and grueling it can actually be.

I worked as a barista for a major coffee chain this summer, and while the experience itself was enjoyable — especially the free drink perk — dealing with rude and cranky customers was not. From handling situations where a customer wanted their drink remade four times to people not believing we don’t sell smoothies, I’ve seen firsthand how intense customer service jobs can be, when in the past, I’ve overlooked them. 

Apart from learning communication skills when talking to customers and ensuring they receive the best care possible, customer service workers also have to be able to think quickly and solve any problems that arise randomly throughout a shift. Some customers will have very specific requests, and it may be difficult to decipher what they actually want, but it’s important to remember the workers are doing their best to accommodate the customer, and no one should cry over spilled coffee.

One of the main things I realized working as a barista is there are many interruptions beyond the employee’s control that disrupts the flow of drink-making, so I understand now why drinks sometimes take a while to come out. Knowing what it’s like to be slammed with orders makes you think twice before getting angry and impatient with the baristas behind the counter.

You’d be hard-pressed to find anyone who doesn’t have horror stories about their work, but nothing makes you appreciate the work they actually do like living it yourself. Whether it’s working customer service in the form of a coffee shop, restaurant or retail, it motivates you to want to be a better customer because now you know what it’s like on the flip side.

Anyone who’s worked in customer service before understands what it’s like to be snapped at or yelled at and are less likely to do it themselves because they don’t want to cause workers the stress and anxiety they’ve experienced. So in times of impatience as a customer, it’s beneficial to relate to the people working behind the counter and realize being compassionate helps most of all.

The golden saying of “treat others how you would want to be treated” is a universal philosophy and applies heavily in the world of customer service. Of all the lessons life teaches us, kindness should outweigh them all, and customer service workers are a group of people who would benefit greatly from a bit more of it.

Alice is a sophomore in LAS.

alicewl2@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/31/customer-service-workers-deserve-appreciation/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini The Starbucks in the Illini Union experiencing a rush hour around 1 p.m. on Tuesday. Columnist Alice Lee explains how rush hours like this can cause stress for customer service workers.
News-Gazette Media to sell almost all assets https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/30/news-gazette-media-to-sell-almost-all-assets/ https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/30/news-gazette-media-to-sell-almost-all-assets/#respond Fri, 30 Aug 2019 20:34:28 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216257 Along with filing for chapter 11 bankruptcy and notifying employees of potential layoffs starting this October, News-Gazette Media will be sold to the family-owned Champaign Multimedia Group LLC, an affiliated company of Community Media Group, according to an article by The News-Gazette. News-Gazette Media CEO John Reed announced in a meeting with News-Gazette staff Friday...

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Along with filing for chapter 11 bankruptcy and notifying employees of potential layoffs starting this October, News-Gazette Media will be sold to the family-owned Champaign Multimedia Group LLC, an affiliated company of Community Media Group, according to an article by The News-Gazette.

News-Gazette Media CEO John Reed announced in a meeting with News-Gazette staff Friday that the company had reached an agreement to sell substantially all of its assets to CMG, which owns and operates newspapers in several midwestern states such as Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, New York and Pennsylvania.

Weekly newspapers, free distribution shoppers, websites, along with WDWS, WHMS and WKIO are all part of the acquisition.

“Community Media Group shares our values and represents everything we had hoped to find in the next steward of our newspapers and radio stations,” Reed said in a statement to The News-Gazette. “They have a strong commitment to quality products, and they share our vision of a multimedia future where print, radio and digital media outlets continue to complement one another.”

The sale is expected to close in November, and CMG has noted that it is developing plans for rehiring some former News-Gazette employees following the sale.

“The ultimate decision to seek a buyer was extremely difficult on many levels,” Reed said. “In the end, I have absolute confidence in our selection of Community Media Group and am convinced that both the decision to sell and the selected buyer represent the best possible outcome for our employees, readers and listeners.”

claredb2@dailyillini.com

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Rise in burglaries reported in Champaign https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/30/rise-in-burglaries-reported-in-champaign/ https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/30/rise-in-burglaries-reported-in-champaign/#respond Fri, 30 Aug 2019 13:00:47 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216223 An unusually high number of burglaries has been reported in the Champaign areas close to campus, according to the Champaign Police Department. In most of these cases, offenders were able to enter cars and buildings through unlocked doors. The rise in burglaries has been occurring for the past several weeks. In a Massmail, University Police...

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An unusually high number of burglaries has been reported in the Champaign areas close to campus, according to the Champaign Police Department.

In most of these cases, offenders were able to enter cars and buildings through unlocked doors.

The rise in burglaries has been occurring for the past several weeks.

In a Massmail, University Police Chief Craig Stone recommends keeping any doors locked at all times and leaving valuables such as wallets and electronics out of sight. Never leave anything unattended in places such as a library desk or gym.

jzeped4@dailyillini.com

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University police officer faces sexual harassment allegations https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/30/university-police-officer-faces-sexual-harassment-allegations/ https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/30/university-police-officer-faces-sexual-harassment-allegations/#respond Fri, 30 Aug 2019 12:30:41 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216229 Veteran University Police Officer Brian Tison has been placed on leave since Aug. 5 after new allegations came forward of sexual harassment and misconduct from 2015 and 2018, according to a recent article from The News-Gazette. The article reported separate complaints against Tison were filed earlier this year and are still being investigated by an...

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Veteran University Police Officer Brian Tison has been placed on leave since Aug. 5 after new allegations came forward of sexual harassment and misconduct from 2015 and 2018, according to a recent article from The News-Gazette.

The article reported separate complaints against Tison were filed earlier this year and are still being investigated by an outside attorney.

Without providing further details, Police Chief Craig Stone confirmed in a statement to The Gazette that the latest allegation is under formal review by the department and the University’s Office of Access and Equity, which investigates Title IX sexual-harassment allegations.

Another misconduct investigation from 2017 through 2018 was prompted by complaints from a female officer who Tison trained. The officer accused Tison of giving unwanted hugs, suggestive remarks and inappropriately touching her and other female recruits under his training.

In a July 2018 report, the University’s Title IX office concluded that, while Tison’s behavior was highly unprofessional and inappropriate, it wasn’t severe or pervasive enough to negatively impact the officers’ job performance or work environment.

The University’s strict standard for what constitutes sexual harassment is currently under review by campus officials.

Under recommendation from the investigator, Stone took unspecified corrective action against Tison and stopped him from supervising recruits in July 2018.

In response to the original complaint last fall, Tison emphasized the investigation’s findings that he did not violate sexual misconduct policy and that only one officer had filed a complaint.

In the 2017-2018 report, Tison said he described himself as “touchy-feely person who likes to hug” to the officer, who he considered a friend and treated in a way consistent with other male and female officers, and that she didn’t object.

In response, the officer said she didn’t object only because she felt vulnerable as a new recruit.

The allegations came to light after the officer expressed her discomfort with other officers, and one of her male colleagues reported them in an exit interview.

A University official stated the investigation is still ongoing, but Police Chief Craig Stone responded to The Daily Illini’s request for comment with an emailed statement:

“Officer Brian Tison was placed on paid administrative leave, effective Aug. 5, after the police department learned of a new allegation regarding his conduct in 2015 and 2018. We cannot comment on the specifics of personnel matters. Per department and University policy, the allegation is under formal review through the department’s complaint process and through the university’s Title IX office.

The safety and security of the campus community remain paramount, and all of the University of Illinois Police Department’s practices and policies are developed with that in mind. All applicable University processes were initiated when the department learned of this new allegation.”

claredb2@dailyillini.com

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The Daily Illini police blotter for Aug. 29 https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/30/the-daily-illini-police-blotter-for-aug-29/ https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/30/the-daily-illini-police-blotter-for-aug-29/#respond Fri, 30 Aug 2019 12:00:52 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216225 Champaign  Criminal damage to property was reported on the 200 block of Kenwood Road around 11:45 Wednesday. According to the report, the offender broke the rear window of the victim’s car with a juice bottle. Retail theft was reported at Walmart, 2610 N. Prospect Ave., around 10 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the offender...

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Champaign 

Criminal damage to property was reported on the 200 block of Kenwood Road around 11:45 Wednesday. According to the report, the offender broke the rear window of the victim’s car with a juice bottle.

Retail theft was reported at Walmart, 2610 N. Prospect Ave., around 10 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, the offender stole two pieces of electronic equipment, one briefcase, one piece of clothing, one computer and two cellular phones.

Forgery was reported at Dollar General, 2004B W. Springfield Ave., around 5 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, an unknown offender attempted to use a counterfeit bill to purchase items.

University 

Nothing to report.

Urbana

Retail theft was reported at Circle K, 1501 N. Lincoln Ave., around 3 p.m. Wednesday. According to the report, an unknown offender passed the final point of sale without paying for alcoholic beverages they had concealed.

news@dailyillini.com

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Smith names quarterback Peters week-one starter https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/29/smith-names-quarterback-peters-week-one-starter/ https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/29/smith-names-quarterback-peters-week-one-starter/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:37:45 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216034 Saturday morning marks the beginning of Lovie Smith’s fourth season in Champaign as Illinois prepares to host Akron. Expectations are a notch higher than previous seasons in Smith’s tenure since the roster is more talented and suited to the scheme than ever before. The Illini will be led on offense with Brandon Peters as quarterback;...

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Saturday morning marks the beginning of Lovie Smith’s fourth season in Champaign as Illinois prepares to host Akron. Expectations are a notch higher than previous seasons in Smith’s tenure since the roster is more talented and suited to the scheme than ever before. The Illini will be led on offense with Brandon Peters as quarterback; the graduate transfer from Michigan won the starting job in camp. One of the standout players from camp on offense was sophomore tight end Daniel Barker, whose production will be critical at a position of need for the Illini. While Akron didn’t have the most successful 2018 campaign, the Zips made a habit of playing Big Ten teams close, making Saturday’s contest far from chalk.

Peters takes the reigns

At the conclusion of fall camp, Smith announced Brandon Peters would start the Illini’s opening game as quarterback. The graduate transfer, who has two years of eligibility remaining, passed for 672 yards and four touchdowns in six games at Michigan as a redshirt freshman in 2017. The Wolverines went 2-2 in Peters’ four starts in 2017 before Shea Patterson transferred in from Ole Miss and took the starting job.

Though his tape at Michigan would suggest Peters is mainly a pocket passer, Smith is excited to see him show off his versatility.

“Our quarterback, Brandon Peters, (will) lead our team,” Smith said. “Love everything about him. (He) can throw it, he can run, and he’s moving into a leadership role quickly.”

Peters is coming from a run-heavy scheme during his time at Michigan, which may help him adapt to a system that will prioritize feeding its talented backfield, one Illini offensive coordinator Rod Smith said has “about five” starting caliber tailbacks at his weekly press conference.

Peters picked up the Illinois system as quickly as he could. Given the deficit in time he had with the playbook coupled with having to complete the necessary coursework to get eligible is what has impressed Lovie the most.

“Brandon knew he needed to get a lot of hours to be a graduate (transfer) from the University of Michigan, and that is an awful lot to get it done in that amount of time,” Smith said. “He’s also picked up our offense quickly.”

Barker breaking out

Illinois was dealt a major blow in April when Georgia-transfer tight end Luke Ford was ruled ineligible for the 2019 season. For a group with low production in 2018, the loss of a player with the caliber of Ford looked to be a sign that struggles would continue.

However, sophomore Daniel Barker turned heads during camp, displaying good speed and sure hands to go along with a body built to block.

Constantly making highlight plays on the practice field, Barker’s improvement did not go unnoticed.

“What (Barker) brings is he’s a big body,” Smith said. “He’s a physical guy. He can block. He could be a good endline tight end to block defensive ends. You could (also) spread him out, and he can run all the routes, (and) he can catch the football.”

Despite registering just 84 yards receiving and a single touchdown last season, at six-feet-four-inches tall and 250 pounds, Barker’s physical gifts and potential were always evident.

Throwing to tight ends is something Peters is accustomed to coming from Jim Harbaugh’s system. Of his four touchdown passes at Michigan, three went to tight ends, and Barker certainly fits the profile of the type of tight ends Michigan has had over the past few years: tall, bulky, a skilled blocker and possessing quality speed for his size.

“It’s definitely an advantage,” Peters said. “(Barker’s) a really good blocker. He’s got a lot of range.”

A look at the Zips

Akron finished 2018 4-8 but did knock off eventual West Division Champion Northwestern in Evanston early in the season.

“Wide open offense coming at us, I think they have seven offensive starters returning and a couple on the defensive side of the football,” Smith said. “Last year, of course, they beat our rival up north in purple, and they also played Iowa State hard.”

The Zips are led by first year coach Tom Arth, who at 38 years old will be making his debut at the FBS level, having previously served as a head coach at Division III John Carroll University and most recently in the FCS at University of Tennessee Chattanooga.

Kato Nelson will start at quarterback for the Zips. The junior is coming off of a 2,339-passing-yard 15-passing-touchdown season. He also ran for 303 yards and 1 additional score.

Akron also returns junior receiver Andre Williams, who finished with 649 receiving yards and 6 touchdowns in 2018.

While the Illini have long to go before the rebuild is complete, Saturday’s contest will serve as a barometer for how much progress they’ve made after a full offseason of preparation.

@MilesP_H

milesp2@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/29/smith-names-quarterback-peters-week-one-starter/feed/ 0 Mark Capapas Lovie Smith talks at a press conference. Smith will begin his fourth season with Illinois on Saturday when Illinois hosts Akron at Memorial Stadium.
Daily Illini police blotter for August 27 https://dailyillini.com/news/crime/2019/08/29/daily-illini-police-blotter-for-august-27/ https://dailyillini.com/news/crime/2019/08/29/daily-illini-police-blotter-for-august-27/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:00:48 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216130 Champaign A violation of an order of protection was reported on the 2400 block of Springfield Avenue around 9 p.m. Monday. According to the report, the victim received unwanted calls and text messages she believed to be from her ex-husband. Theft was reported at Walmart, 2610 N Prospect Ave., around 4 p.m. Monday. According to...

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Champaign

A violation of an order of protection was reported on the 2400 block of Springfield Avenue around 9 p.m. Monday. According to the report, the victim received unwanted calls and text messages she believed to be from her ex-husband.

Theft was reported at Walmart, 2610 N Prospect Ave., around 4 p.m. Monday. According to the report, the offender stole four cell phones from the business over the course of two weeks.

Deceptive practices were reported on the 1400 block of Briarwood Drive around 11 a.m. Monday. According to the report, the victim discovered a large amount of money had been withdrawn from her savings account without her authorization.

University

Theft was reported at Illini Union Bookstore, 809 S. Wright St., around 1:30 p.m. Monday. According to the report, the offender stole a backpack worth $87 from the bookstore. 

Theft was reported at University parking lot E-14, 1625 S. First St., overnight Saturday or Sunday. According to the report, an unknown offender stole the victim’s wallet containing $250 in cash, personal documents and bank cards from the victim’s car.

Identity theft, credit card fraud, theft and using fraudulent identification was reported at University Public Safety Building, 1110 W. Springfield Ave., around 7 p.m. Saturday. According to the report, the two offenders were first identified as wanted suspects by store security at Menards, 620 W. Town Center Blvd. after using fraudulent information to rent a vehicle from Willard Airport on June 24 and never returning the vehicle. The police recovered the stolen vehicle at Menards and later arrested the suspects after questioning.

Urbana

Deceptive practices were reported on the 1900 block of Easy Street around noon Monday. According to the report, an unknown offender told the victim money had been deposited into the victim’s account. The victim repaid the offender but later discovered no money was initially deposited.

Criminal damage to property was reported on the 1700 block of Melrose Village Circle around 8 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, an unknown offender damaged the door of the victim’s apartment. 

Criminal damage to property was reported at Chi Psi Fraternity House, 606 West Ohio St., around 10 p.m. Sunday. According to the report, an unknown offender damaged a window of the house.

news@dailyillini.com

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New students look to future, alumni reflect on past https://dailyillini.com/features/2019/08/29/new-students-future-alumni-past/ https://dailyillini.com/features/2019/08/29/new-students-future-alumni-past/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:00:37 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216062 Between the late nights studying and the late nights not studying, college can be an exciting time and one many students want to make memorable. Most students have goals they want to achieve, internships they want to score and careers they want to begin. The University provides opportunities for these goals to materialize. Current students...

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Between the late nights studying and the late nights not studying, college can be an exciting time and one many students want to make memorable. Most students have goals they want to achieve, internships they want to score and careers they want to begin. The University provides opportunities for these goals to materialize.

Current students share what they hope to achieve by graduation whilst alumni share how they made the most out of their time here.

Aynur Namik, freshman in LAS, is looking forward to learning Korean, in addition to majoring in biology on a pre-PA track. Namik said she would really like to learn a new language. She has been studying the language since the beginning of high school and did a study abroad in South Korea during her junior year. Currently, she is taking a Korean class.

Namik also wants to join RSOs and is considering the ultimate frisbee team. “Maybe (I’ll join) some language classes or professional classes like the pre-PA club,” she said.

Namik is interested in dabbling in research, given the University’s reputation.

“It would be really nice to have research experience, especially since I’m going (to) a research university,” she said. “I’ll probably have it geared more toward like human health or working with people hands on, so maybe something that has to do with that and the human body.”

Bruce Escalante, freshman in LAS, is looking forward to joining RSOs, and he already has an idea of which to join. Bruce is interested in the campus culture houses as well and is interested in trying new restaurants.

“(I want to) eat as much new food as I can and just try to find really good restaurants,” he said.

He will study East Asian Languages and Cultures, specifically Chinese. He wants to go the Illini Union often, and see the Japan House as well.

Alumna Nada Naffakh offers freshmen her advice about how to best approach the college experience, academically and socially. Naffakh, who graduated in the spring from the College of Engineering, currently works as a traffic engineer in Peoria, Illinois. Naffakh encourages new students to join clubs to help garner pre-professional experience, citing her time with the Society of Women Engineers as a positive experience.

“I got a lot of really interesting opportunities out of that,” Naffakh said. “When I was in the Society of Women Engineers, I was part of the group called Team Tech, and (with) Team Tech you partner with a company that gives you a problem that they have, and you develop a way to solve it.”

In her first two years, they competed in the Team Tech competition at the Society of Women Engineers National Conference, placing first and third place respectively.

Naffakh said news students should try to land summer internships, an experience she wish she would have had as a student.

“I feel like internships definitely help you pick out what your interests are,” she said. “Studies and coursework kind of gives you the basics, but being able to really get in there and see what the job market is like, see what different job opportunities are available to you, firsthand, is really helpful, and again it’s just a big resume builder.”

Naffakh said it’s not all about the studies, however. New students should find spots to sit, places they love — finding small nooks and crannies on campus can make campus feel smaller and make you feel more at home. The places we spend our time at and the people we spend our time with are what we will remember after graduation, she said.

“I really like the Engineering Quad in the fall for no reason other than the fact that the trees there are so beautiful,” Naffakh said. “I can’t say that at the time I liked it, but now looking back, I spent a lot of my time in Grainger library, so I guess we have this kind of a special bond, Grainger and (me).”

apirge2@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/features/2019/08/29/new-students-future-alumni-past/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini Freshmen and orientation leaders gather outside of Foellinger Auditorium on Aug. 22. Current University students discuss what they hope to achieve by graduation while alumni reminisce on what they most enjoyed during their time on campus.
UI to host student coding competition https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/29/coding-competition-brings-esports-computer-engineering/ https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/29/coding-competition-brings-esports-computer-engineering/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:00:37 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216044 For many computer coding competitions, judges determine the winners and losers in private with predetermined criterion, which does not always allow the contestants to know why their code won or lost. However, a coding competition event coming to the University in September will allow competitors to show off their codes to each other. The event,...

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For many computer coding competitions, judges determine the winners and losers in private with predetermined criterion, which does not always allow the contestants to know why their code won or lost. However, a coding competition event coming to the University in September will allow competitors to show off their codes to each other.

The event, Terminal Live @ UIUC, is a hackathon-style event that will have students pair up in teams of three and create a workable, competitive code that will be used to compete head-to-head in a tower-defense-style game against other teams.

“It’s basically e-sports for software engineers. And it’s really a thrilling experience” said Andrew Strong, head of business operations at Correlation One, in an email. Correlation One is a company that helps other companies find quantitative and technical employees.

Terminal, the name used to describe the game itself, was created by Correlation One in response to how other coding competitions were run — that winners are determined by judges in private. Instead, once the competing teams have completed their code, they will be able to show off their creations to the other competitors in a tournament.

Strong said Terminal is much like chess in that it is easy to learn the basic rules but very challenging to master.

“The competition is mostly difficult, not because the game is hard, but because students have to compete head-to-head against their peers, who are just as smart, curious and eager to win,” Strong said.

The basic game of Terminal is available on Correlation One’s website but varies slightly between competitions. The upcoming competition the University is hosting is different because it is Correlation One’s first competition of the fall 2019 season.

While competitors at Terminal Live @ UIUC will mostly consist of University students, other students from Northwestern University, University of Chicago and Purdue University will also be competing.

Correlation One is partnering with Citadel to make the event possible. During the event, competitors will be able to network with Citadel representatives and have the potential to be recruited by Citadel.

Correlation One is also working with the University’s Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. They have a history of working together in the past, as IEEE looks to Correlation One to provide data science competitions, while Correlation One looks to IEEE to help make its events possible.

Matthew Klock, junior in Engineering and member of IEEE, said they help advertise the event and make the event apart of the University’s culture. He said IEEE wanted to bring the event to campus because they think it is a great way to provide computer engineering students with a challenge.

“This is a great opportunity for people of all skill levels to expand and showcase what they know,” Klock said.

From a student perspective, Klock said the best way to prepare is to know how to play. He recommends going on the Terminal website and defeating the bosses available.

Applications for Terminal Live @ UIUC will be accepted until Monday at 11:59 p.m. Interested competitors will apply individually and then form teams among those that are selected. The competition will be held Sept. 14. The winning team will get $25,000 in cash.

“I expect to see some crazy algorithms this year and some great competition,” Klock said.

jzeped4@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/29/coding-competition-brings-esports-computer-engineering/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini Two students create code during a competition. At Terminal Live events, a team of students write code to compete in an online strategy game against other teams.
Be wary of statistics https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/29/be-aware-manipulation-statistics/ https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/29/be-aware-manipulation-statistics/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:00:25 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216066 We are constantly inundated by a sea of information, and in the age of the internet,  every claim needs to be backed up by several sources to even have a chance at being considered reputable. But statistics and research aren’t always what they seem. It’s incredibly simple to manipulate statistics — percentages and charts feel...

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We are constantly inundated by a sea of information, and in the age of the internet,  every claim needs to be backed up by several sources to even have a chance at being considered reputable. But statistics and research aren’t always what they seem.

It’s incredibly simple to manipulate statistics — percentages and charts feel intuitive.  Unverifiable claims like “nine out of 10 dentists recommend … ” are ubiquitous. However, there are several more sophisticated and insidious techniques to manipulate numbers that are much harder to identify.  

One easy way to misuse data is by applying the conclusions of a study to a population it did not accurately sample. For example, many medical studies and clinical trials center on white people, while underrepresenting or even excluding minority groups altogether. While the results of the study may very well be useful in treating and diagnosing the population of white males, it is not accurate and sometimes even actively harmful to claim and make decisions as if the study gives a holistic portrayal of how a disorder presents in all people.  

While errors like this are sometimes a result of genuine ignorance, the consequences of making claims about a population based on a limited or biased sample are overwhelmingly negative, and culpability for those consequences lies on the shoulders of researchers. 

Apart from errors of convenience or bias, there are many corporate and government-funded studies  designed to seek a specific conclusion; in other words, the study is likely to produce results in the interests of the organization funding it. This was a tactic infamously used by Big Tobacco, a group that not only funded and published research that aligned with their interests but actively suppressed and criticized opposing research.  

By carefully choosing a sample, and by tweaking the constraints of a statistical model that delineate the line between a successs and a failure, inconclusive data can be nudged in the direction of a favorable outcome. Furthermore, the choices made when visualizing data can also lead to deception. From the size of the ticks to the colors used to using a backward scale, it’s almost too easy to make boring data hit hard and make shocking results seem commonplace. 

Every researcher needs to be aware of these pitfalls. Those seriously pursuing discovery and truth must be acutely mindful of drawing conclusions truly supported by the data. It’s an impossible task to look into every statistic you come across, but simply understanding bias, error and room for interpretation are qualities inherent to statistics is a big step up from accepting statistics at face value.

Sandhya is a junior in LAS.

ssivak3@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/29/be-aware-manipulation-statistics/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini Statistics and charts crowd the screen of a laptop. Columnist Sandhya hopes to draw attention to ubiquitous statistics and warns people to remain skeptical of unverified numbers.
Graduate students want transparency in leadership search https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/29/graduate-students-college-of-media-dean-work-improve-transparency/ https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/29/graduate-students-college-of-media-dean-work-improve-transparency/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:00:22 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216146 The graduate students of the Institute of Communications Research held an open meeting on Tuesday with Tracy Sulkin, dean of the College of Media, to discuss the process of selecting the next leadership team for the ICR. Members of the new leadership team will be chosen from among the current ICR faculty. The meeting was...

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The graduate students of the Institute of Communications Research held an open meeting on Tuesday with Tracy Sulkin, dean of the College of Media, to discuss the process of selecting the next leadership team for the ICR.

Members of the new leadership team will be chosen from among the current ICR faculty. The meeting was prompted as a response to an open letter, sent last June, from graduate students to the College of Media administration. 

“Our doctoral students reached out with questions about the process to select leadership and ways in which they can participate, and so the College of Media leadership team was pleased to meet with them today,” Sulkin said in an email. 

Graduate students were invited to the meeting to share their thoughts and concerns about the University’s doctoral program. 

“The graduate program is a given, and the doctoral program is a given,” Sulkin said at the beginning of the meeting. “There is no question about the doctoral program being a priority here.”

Sulkin explained the ICR has been a key component of the ollege’s past as well as a crucial part of its future. 

At the meeting, several graduate students expressed their concern the administrative decision-making process had not been completely transparent. Students felt as if they were mostly on the “receiving end,” being informed about changes after the faculty had already made decisions. 

The issue of representation, the students added, is important to take into consideration when choosing the next leadership team. 

Sulkin said the college is trying to come up with processes most — if not all — people feel are fair. The executive committee is working to focus more on gathering information to elicit broader and more inclusive participation from the college as a whole. 

“We will communicate very clearly to you every process,” Sulkin said. 

Some students agreed the issue of broken trust between the college and ICR graduate students is organizational. The college is, therefore, working to change its ways to ensure everyone is informed and updated in an efficient manner. Suggestions include creating a flow chart of how the department makes decisions, establishing a more methodized email inbox and changing the college’s website to be more up to date. 

Sulkin said the executive committee will consist of four members, one from each department and one at-large member. Because the bylaws for the ICR were written a long time ago, it does not include student representatives. 

“One thing to work on is revisions to the bylaws,” Sulkin said during the meeting. “We do operate by bylaws, and we stick with those that are written, but bylaws can be changed.” 

Some graduate students who were at the meeting were unable to individually comment at the time of publication.

sekang2@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/29/graduate-students-college-of-media-dean-work-improve-transparency/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini A look inside Gregory Hall where the College of Media is located. Graduate students of the Institute of Communications Research, or ICR, are asking the College of Media for transparency in the selection process for the next ICR leadership team.
Quade opens senior season with all-conference honors https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/29/quade-opens-senior-season-with-all-conference-honors/ https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/29/quade-opens-senior-season-with-all-conference-honors/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:00:22 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216031 Illinois volleyball senior Jacqueline Quade was unanimously selected to the Preseason All-Big Ten team on Monday. Selected by Big Ten Conference coaches, the honor is a first for Illinois’ outside hitter. Nearly nine months ago, Quade was an unanimous selection to the 2018 All Big-Ten team following her breakout season as a six-rotation player. Just...

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Illinois volleyball senior Jacqueline Quade was unanimously selected to the Preseason All-Big Ten team on Monday. Selected by Big Ten Conference coaches, the honor is a first for Illinois’ outside hitter.

Nearly nine months ago, Quade was an unanimous selection to the 2018 All Big-Ten team following her breakout season as a six-rotation player.

Just two weeks after being selected, Quade and the 2018 Illini had their season cut short by Nebraska in the Final Four of the NCAA tournament. Despite the final outcome and the loss of star seniors Jordyn Poulter and Ali Bastianelli, Quade’s individual growth continued to stand out.

Quade also received honors from the NCAA, American Volleyball Coaches Association and VolleyballMag.com following her junior year.

While it would be easy to let the many accolades alter her mindset, Quade has remained humble. The Fort Wayne, Indiana, native acknowledges her success and now remains positive about the improvements she still needs to make.

“Despite the year we had, the year I had, there’s still so much more we can do which is really exciting,” Quade said. “It’s cool to be able to come into the gym and be like, ‘Wow, I still need to get so much better at all these different facets of my game.’”

The quality time Quade has spent in the gym has paid off, as she paced the Illini and the Big Ten with 560 total kills, averaging 4.24 per set and a .265 kill hitting percentage. Quade’s talents ranked her sixth in the nation.

Now that Quade is completely comfortable as a six-rotation player and the Illini’s most valuable target, the hitter is ready to assume a larger leadership role as she enters her final season.

Both redshirt freshman Diana Brown and Auburn transfer Mica Allison will make their debuts as Illini setters this season following Jordyn Poulter’s departure. Quade has been focused on helping the two young setters prepare for their time on the court together.

“(I’m) just helping out the younger players, helping them to feel comfortable on the court,” Quade said. “We have two new setters, so as a hitter, just letting them know that, ‘Yeah, it’s never going to be perfect, but I can help you guys out.’ If they’re having a tough time, just being there to help them with that.”

Brown saw game action with Quade in the Orange and Blue scrimmage Saturday, but Allison sat out with an injury.

Redshirt freshman and outside Bruna Vrankovic has also been learning from Quade after spending a year only practicing. Vrankovic showed her power and talent at the scrimmage but also proved she is a raw talent after initially struggling.

While the Illini are still working through some kinks after playing in the scrimmage, Quade believes the team just needs more time to mesh together and learn each other’s playing styles.

“Overall, just connections and chemistry, just working together as a team and just getting comfortable being on the court together,” Quade said.

Quade and the Illini will have to work quickly to find that flow as their regular season begins Friday at Tennessee. The Illini will then face Tennessee again at Huff Hall on Sunday.

@gabby_h11

ghajduk2@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/29/quade-opens-senior-season-with-all-conference-honors/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini Illinois outside hitter Jacqueline Quade spikes the ball during the match against Marquette in the third round of the NCAA tournament at Huff Hall on Dec. 7. The Illini won 3-0.
Make your freshman year a foundation to build on https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/29/editorial-freshman-year-base-to-build/ https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/29/editorial-freshman-year-base-to-build/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:00:21 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216067 If you’re starting your first year at the University of Illinois, remember this: Not everything will go as projected.  As you navigate the University, plan on parts being scary and parts being hard. Plan on mistakes. Plan on losing. But it’s essential you keep trying and work to build a solid foundation for your coming semesters...

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If you’re starting your first year at the University of Illinois, remember this: Not everything will go as projected. 

As you navigate the University, plan on parts being scary and parts being hard. Plan on mistakes. Plan on losing. But it’s essential you keep trying and work to build a solid foundation for your coming semesters during your freshman year. Stable roots will mollify impending failures and make springing back from them far easier.

As with most foundations, the platform from which you will construct your experience has four corners. 

The first corner is friendship. (We know this sounds like something straight out of a Teletubbies episode, but bear with us.) No one can stand alone. To truly succeed — and avoid the desire to ram an iClicker through your lonesome skull — you have to surround yourself with people who prop you up. 

These fellow students will help you erect a magnificent structure on top of your foundation. They are your construction workers, and you are the project manager. Don’t be afraid to give them a hammer and a few nails and tell them to start building. 

However, this is a two-way street. You must also be willing to put on a hard hat and pick up a few tools for them. Every one of your construction workers is also the project manager for their own collegiate magnum opus. 

If you are now thinking to yourself, “Well, I already know friends are important, but how in the name of Alma Mater do I find people ready to join my construction team?”

It’s easy to meet people on a campus with over 40,000 enrolled undergraduates. The hard part is finding the true gems or, to continue our tiring metaphor, those who know their way around an Allen wrench. 

The only advice we can give you is to meet as many people as you can. Introduce yourself to those you sit next to in class. Spark up a conversation with some rando on the quad. Say hi to your 80s-rock-blasting neighbors in the dorms. Some of them might just end up in your wedding party.

The second corner is academics. Yes, we’re all here for this one, and a lot of you are probably wondering why it isn’t the first corner. Well, friends make life livable. (If this doesn’t satisfy you, be secure in the knowledge we’re building rectangular foundations and thus each corner is technically equal to its counterparts, regardless of which one we list first.)

Academics are a critical part of a student’s college experience. You should have fun, but you should also learn what you came here to learn so you can become a productive member of society upon graduating.

You will regret blacking out at The Red Lion the night before your exam. Maybe not in the moment, but you definitely will regret it when you’re staring down at the essay question and you realize you have no idea how to analyze the changing archetypes in 18th-century poetry and compare them to reminiscent themes in contemporary literature. Oh, yeah, that’s forehead-sweat worthy. 

Doing well in your classes your freshman year will set a precedent of good grades, one that will help keep you on the straight and narrow all while promoting positive study habits.

Extracurricular activities make up the third corner. No college experience is complete sans involvement in something other than school and friends. 

Joining an organization on campus will help you develop time management skills, provide a much needed break from your studies and is a great opportunity for lateral networking. Leadership in these clubs and activities also looks great on a resume and can be a great way to augment your education.

The last corner is family. While here, you should do your best to remain in contact with your loved ones from home. They are permanent members of your construction squad, not just for your University project but on all of them. Sometimes it’s good to check in with your workers and inspect their work; make sure all the nails are in the right place. 

Call your mom once in a while. Text your sister to see how she’s holding up. If nothing else, video call home so you can tell your dog how much you miss them.

So get out there and build your foundation, Illini! We can’t wait to see your masterpieces.

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Study efficiently with a timer https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/29/study-efficiently-with-a-timer/ https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/29/study-efficiently-with-a-timer/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:00:21 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216042 As another semester falls upon us, so does the eternal, burning question: How do we get back to focusing on school again? We can’t answer that question easily after having spent three months without classes on our radar. We’re a little rusty as students; it’s not like there were any deadlines on the beach, nor...

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As another semester falls upon us, so does the eternal, burning question: How do we get back to focusing on school again?

We can’t answer that question easily after having spent three months without classes on our radar. We’re a little rusty as students; it’s not like there were any deadlines on the beach, nor did our vacations gave us any take-home assignments. For a lot of us, it still feels like summer, even when our brains desperately need to kick it into autumn gear.

Maybe we can come closer to solving this problem if we redefine the problem itself: What if we didn’t need to re-establish focus as much as we needed to re-establish urgency?

Many of us may feel as though our habits themselves lead to a clunky transition back to school: It’s hard to redefine certain habits as distractions — napping, exercising or just simply lounging around — when they’ve become our daily rituals over the long break. 

That can’t be the full scoop, though. Research has shown  even when classes are in full swing, these same activities during study breaks can be beneficial to productivity (using social media, however, can have the opposite effect). 

My theory — perhaps a little unscientific — is our productivity reflects the level of urgency we allot to our tasks. This is true year-round: we can all agree, for example, spending an hour on homework is very different than spending an hour on an exam. We’ve had days when we can’t stop checking our phones long enough to finish one sentence for an online discussion response. On the other hand, we’ve taken tests so draining they make us forget our phones even exist. 

The difference? Of course, one assignment may be worth less than 1% of our final grade, while the other might be worth as much as 40%. 

A point that supersedes grades, however, is you only get an hour or so to finish an exam. You get a couple of days to complete homework, which might lead to the illusion that you can take as long as you want on it, even when you might only need an hour or two to finish it.

Summer is one big time vacuum. The first step toward curing a back-to-school slump, therefore, must be to reintroduce yourself to the concept of time constraints. 

A solution is to use a shot clock.

On average, it takes me about two to three hours to write a single column. Using that as a baseline, I began a timer for an hour at the moment I started on this piece, making sure I had a clear view of the countdown as I worked. 

As usual, nothing kept me from scrolling through Spotify or cleaning out my inbox. In this instance, however, I had a heightened awareness of how much time a detour would cost me.

The results? Promising. Although I couldn’t quite bang the whole thing out in under an hour, my time didn’t look bad compared to the two- to three-hour baseline. That’s not too shabby, especially right after a week in which the most intellectual thing I did was read the back of a cereal box.

Some words of caution: A homework shot clock shouldn’t be used to rush your work. The end of your time limit could mean different things depending on what you want to accomplish, whether it’s a set number of problems or paragraphs. (I guess I should have defined what I wanted to get done in an hour before starting the clock, but honestly, just the idea of a countdown got my adrenaline pumping so hard I wanted to write a novel.)

This should simply be a tool to pace yourself. Give yourself just enough time to complete your task, but if you’re still chugging away when the timer beeps, it just means the shot clock is doing its job.

So before you enroll in an online time management class, see what a simple stopwatch can do for your schedule. It might be well worth your while.

Tommy is a junior in Engineering.

tblock2@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/29/study-efficiently-with-a-timer/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini A student uses his laptop. Columnist Tommy urges students to set study timers for themselves in an effort to stay focused after a summer without classes.
Optimism may lead to better sleep https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/29/optimism-may-lead-to-better-sleep/ https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/29/optimism-may-lead-to-better-sleep/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:00:18 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216141 After four years of attending the University, senior in LAS Kathryn Lenz says she still sleeps better at home in Chicago than on campus. A recent study led by a University professor investigated if there is a positive correlation between being more optimistic and getting better quality sleep. “When I’m at school, I always feel...

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After four years of attending the University, senior in LAS Kathryn Lenz says she still sleeps better at home in Chicago than on campus. A recent study led by a University professor investigated if there is a positive correlation between being more optimistic and getting better quality sleep.

“When I’m at school, I always feel like I could be doing something else, like homework or studying, instead of sleeping,” Lenz said. “At home, I don’t have that pressing issue weighing on my mind.”

Rosalba Hernandez, professor in Social Work and leader of the study, and her research team found evidence to suggest more optimistic people were reporting better sleep quality.

However, because the study is mainly observational, it is difficult to know for certain the correlation, Hernandez said.

The study tested participants across the Midwest region to assess the correlation between optimism levels and sleep quality.

“My research really focuses on the influence of positive emotion, what we call psychological well-being, and health in general,” Hernandez said.

Optimism levels were calculated based on a six-item survey called the Life Orientation Test-Revised, which has been traditionally used as a valid and reliable method to calculate emotion levels, according to Hernandez.

The study found as each reported standard deviation in optimism score increased, participants’ were 78 % more likely to report better sleep quality.

However, Hernandez warns the results do not prove a direct correlation with optimism to sleep quality, though it is a likely mechanism. She says there could be multiple pathways additionally correlated.

“One is that people who are more optimistic tend to cope better with stress, and therefore, when they go to sleep, they’re able to sleep better and not think about stressors in their lives,” Hernandez said.

She says another possible mechanism is through health behaviors, with research showing positive emotions can cause engagement in physical activity and a healthier diet.

“The other is just physiological,” Hernandez said. “Somehow, optimism is able to better regulate hormones and things related to sleep.”

Lauren Engelhard, senior in LAS, said she finds it difficult to determine what impacts her sleep levels at school because there are a variety of factors.

“I’m so exhausted from classes, social activities and other obligations, so I might fall asleep faster,” she said. “However, I also stay up later, go to sleep at different times and drink more.”

Engelhard said she thinks the less sleep she receives, the less optimistic she will feel on a daily basis.

Hernandez said some do believe sleeping well makes you happier and can lead to more positive emotions. She said research shows people who sleep better tend to have decreased cases of chronic diseases, decreased risks of high blood pressure, decreased cases of diabetes and increased longevity.

The study found with just one standard deviation higher, optimism scores related to better-reported sleep quality across five years, relative to those with persistently low sleep quality.

Hernandez’s previous research has dealt primarily with optimism levels impacting various aspects of health looking at cardiovascular issues, hypertension, kidney dysfunction and hemodialysis. She also has studied how to best intervene and create a resolution to this issue.

Hernandez said research has shown there are eight particular techniques found to increase positive emotion.

“It’s not something you are born with, something can be done,” she said.

Some of the techniques include identifying three good things that happened on a daily basis before going to sleep, expressing gratitude to family and friends, mindfulness or engaging in the present moment and participating in meditation, according to Hernandez.

Engelhard said she makes an effort to increase her levels of optimism in college through regulating her sleep patterns, frequent exercise and healthy meals.

“I work to find a balance between classes, schoolwork, working, my social life and other things that I enjoy,” she said.

Lenz says she attempts to increase her optimism levels at school by talking regularly on the phone with family or friends to remind herself there is a bigger world outside of her stressful environment.

Hernandez says students should be mindful about how sleep quality heavily impacts behavior and functioning at high academic performance.

“The ultimate goal when looking at psychological impact is to look at overall health and longevity,” Hernandez said. “So our reason behind looking at sleep is maybe sleep is the link or one of the links between emotion and health.”

rnwood2@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/29/optimism-may-lead-to-better-sleep/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini Rosalba Hernandez, professor in Social Work, recently worked on a study that investigated the correlation between being optimistic and sleep levels. Hernandez found other factors are linked to sleep quality in addition to optimism.
University bans all tobacco products https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/29/university-bans-all-tobacco-products/ https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/29/university-bans-all-tobacco-products/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:00:17 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216075 In a Massmail to University students, Chancellor Robert Jones announced the University’s smoke and tobacco-free campus policy is now officially in effect, banning all tobacco products and vaping devices on campus-owned property. While the University has been a smoke-free campus since 2014, the chancellor announced last fall the policy would be expanded to include smoke-free...

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In a Massmail to University students, Chancellor Robert Jones announced the University’s smoke and tobacco-free campus policy is now officially in effect, banning all tobacco products and vaping devices on campus-owned property.

While the University has been a smoke-free campus since 2014, the chancellor announced last fall the policy would be expanded to include smoke-free forms of tobacco such as chewing tobacco, snuff and dissolvable strips and orbs.

“From an institutional perspective, since we now have a medical school here on the campus, as a role model nationally and worldwide in terms of good health, we felt it was important to add smokeless tobacco to the list of things we prohibited in our smoke-free policy,” said Michele Guerra, director of Campus Wellness Center.

Guerra said the extension was a logical progression of the policy based on increasing evidence of tobacco’s health hazards, regardless of the form in which it is consumed.

“From a public health perspective, as time has gone by, there has been more and more research adding to the concerns of just how deadly all tobacco and nicotine products, not just smoking forms, are,” Guerra said.

Guerra said a particular concern on college campuses is the vulnerable age when students begin using tobacco and developing addictions.

“We know that most people who use tobacco and nicotine products usually start sporadically in their teens and late teens and oftentimes develop what can be a deadly addiction that’s very hard to break by the age of about 26, so the traditional college years are a time when many people become addicted,” Guerra said. “We wanted to do what we could to encourage people to make healthy choices during that important time of life.”

Guerra said at a time when the use of vaping products has spiked among young populations, the University’s goal is to educate students that newer, more popular forms of smoking are far from harmless.

“Many people on campus mistakenly think that vaping is just flavored water, but it’s actually a very potent nicotine delivery system, and it has its own health risks,” Guerra said. “We’re going to be doing a lot of informational programming to get the word out.”

With the first death connected to vaping reported from Illinois, Cabral Bigman, associate professor in LAS who specializes in health communication, said it’s essential students are aware of the dangerous short-term effects of vaping that are harder to ignore.

“It is important to realize that the health risks are not just long-term,” Bigman said in an email. “If the University finds that there is a lack of awareness of health risks, then an educational intervention could be something to consider.”

Bigman said the lax oversight and relative lack of information surrounding the rapidly growing vaping industry has contributed to its rise as an alternative to other smoking forms.

“When compared to cigarettes, companies have been able to advertise and market vaping products without as much regulatory oversight,” Bigman said. “I believe that has contributed to the current trends.”

Sonali Kumar, freshman in Engineering, said regardless of campus policy or enforcement, there will always be safe havens for students to use tobacco or marijuana on or off-campus.

“You can just go to any place that doesn’t have as much University presence or an apartment where there isn’t an RA inspecting dorms,” Kumar said. “People can find a way to find devices or smoke no matter what.”

Katie Lamarche, sophomore in LAS, was also doubtful that the policy’s adjustments would affect the usage of tobacco, nicotine or marijuana among students.

“I can see where the policy is coming from, but at the same time, that’s not going to prevent (smoking) from being on campus,” Lemarche said. “I’ve seen people outside of the (Undergraduate Library) or the Main Library smoking anything from a Juul to a cigarette to weed.”

Bigman said even if changes are not immediately seen, more awareness will create a healthier campus.

“As with any policy, some people may try to get around it,” Bigman said. “However, enforcement of a smoke-free campus helps to promote the health and well-being of the campus, and contributes to population-based approaches that have been effective in reducing smoking.”

claredb2@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/29/university-bans-all-tobacco-products/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini A smoke-free campus sign is displayed in parking lot E2 by the Architecture Building on Aug. 28. To combat the rise in popularity of smokeless tobacco products among college students, the University has revised its campus policy to include all tobacco products and vaping devices.
Illini start season on home course https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/29/illini-start-season-on-home-course/ https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/29/illini-start-season-on-home-course/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 12:00:11 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216071 Illinois men’s and women’s cross country are set to kick off their seasons this Friday in Urbana at the Illini Open. Hosted at the UI Arboretum, the women’s 5K will begin at 5 p.m. and the men’s 8K at 5:40 p.m. The women’s cross country program returns to action after a historic 2018 season. At...

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Illinois men’s and women’s cross country are set to kick off their seasons this Friday in Urbana at the Illini Open. Hosted at the UI Arboretum, the women’s 5K will begin at 5 p.m. and the men’s 8K at 5:40 p.m.

The women’s cross country program returns to action after a historic 2018 season. At the 2018 NCAA Midwest Regional, Illinois improved upon its 2017 24th place finish with a top-4 finish — making 2018 the team’s best finish at the Midwest Regional since 2009.

Also at play for the start of the Illini’s 2019 campaign is the return of all seven athletes who competed at the Midwest Regional the previous year: juniors Allison McGrath, Rebecca Craddock, Nicki Cast and Katie Stapleton and sophomores Madison Marasco, Caroline Fix and Emma Milburn. In total, the team has 17 returning players from the previous season, providing second-year head coach Sarah Haveman a familiar foundation to build her program around this year. 

Six newcomers to the program will be making their orange and blue debuts at the Illini Open, including freshmen Olivia Howell and Emma Wilson, who have both earned national recognition for their cross country and track and field performances in high school. The pair are joined by classmates Katie Hohe, Brianna Lausev, Victoria Palma and Christina Pierini.

Men’s cross country will compete with eight program veterans this season, including two All-Americans: redshirt junior Jon Davis and redshirt senior Jesse Reiser. 

Davis will return after a standout 2017 season, during which he won the NCAA Midwest Regional and recorded the second-fastest 10K in the history of Illinois men’s cross country. Reiser comes into the fall after a successful indoor and outdoor track campaign, where he won two event titles and placed eighth in the 1500-meter at the Big Ten Championships.

Fellow veterans also include sophomores Logan Hall and Colin Yandel and redshirt senior Zach Dale. Hall and Yandel both finished in the top five for the Illini at both the Big Ten Championships and Midwest Regional, while Dale led the Illini at the Big Ten Championships with a finish time of 25:02.5.

Like their counterparts on the course, the men’s team also is welcoming new additions to the program this season. They will add seven runners to their program — all of whom come from the state of Illinois. Among the newcomers is Downers Grove native Jack Roberts, who was part of the Downers Grove North 3A state championship team in 2017. Roberts is joined by teammate Brendan Lockerby and by fellow freshmen Eddie Lennon, Michael Madiol, Bennett Melone, Will O’Brien and Edwin Siuda.

Following the Illini Open, Illinois will be on the road for the remainder of their season, traveling to Terre Haute, Indiana to compete in the John McNichols invite Sept. 21, then to the Ohio State Invite in Columbus, Ohio the following weekend. 

@rachelspenc

 rachels4@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/29/illini-start-season-on-home-course/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini Illinois cross country teams prepare for a meet on Aug. 16. Both the men’s and women’s teams will begin their seasons at the Illini Open on Friday.
Tabel awarded scholarship https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/28/tabel-awarded-scholarship/ https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/28/tabel-awarded-scholarship/#respond Wed, 28 Aug 2019 17:14:12 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216129 Illinois football walk-on, and junior long snapper, Ethan Tabel got a surprise Monday afternoon. Head coach Lovie Smith announced Tabel would receive a scholarship for the 2019 season after two seasons with the team. Smith and Tabel took to Twitter to share the announcements and their thoughts: Couldn’t be more proud of @ethan_tabel, this is...

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Illinois football walk-on, and junior long snapper, Ethan Tabel got a surprise Monday afternoon.

Head coach Lovie Smith announced Tabel would receive a scholarship for the 2019 season after two seasons with the team. Smith and Tabel took to Twitter to share the announcements and their thoughts:

Tabel began long snapping during his junior year of high school at Barrington, where he led the Broncos to the second round of the IHSA Playoffs in 2015. He also won the 2015 Barrington Unsung Hero Special Teams Award and garnered Academic All-Conference and State Scholar accolades.

The Illini junior is slated to take the field in Illinois’ first game of the season at home against Akron.

 

sports@illinimedia.com

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Flatlands Film Festival dances into its sixth year https://dailyillini.com/features/2019/08/28/flatlands-film-festival-dances-into-its-sixth-year/ https://dailyillini.com/features/2019/08/28/flatlands-film-festival-dances-into-its-sixth-year/#respond Wed, 28 Aug 2019 16:00:51 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216051 Illinois’ dance department will host its sixth annual Flatlands Dance Film Festival at the Spurlock Museum.  Laura Chiaramonte, media coordinator and instructor in the dance department, was chosen to be the director for this year’s festival. Chiaramonte is deeply involved in the department; she records and archives all of the dance performances while simultaneously teaching...

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Illinois’ dance department will host its sixth annual Flatlands Dance Film Festival at the Spurlock Museum. 

Laura Chiaramonte, media coordinator and instructor in the dance department, was chosen to be the director for this year’s festival. Chiaramonte is deeply involved in the department; she records and archives all of the dance performances while simultaneously teaching a dance documentation and screen dance course. 

The festival itself kicks off Friday, with the showing of the feature film La Chana. This is an award-winning feature-length film, directed by Lucija Stojevic, that “celebrates the charisma and flair of a self-taught Gypsy flamenco dancer who in the 1960s-80s rose to international stardom,” according to the press release.

La Chana was first released in 2016 and has been screened at a plethora of festivals around the world, such as the Reykjavik International Film Festival and the International Documentary Festival of Amsterdam.

“[La Chana] is this eccentric, amazing dancer who came back into the dance world in her 60s and the film is just incredible,” Chiaramonte said. “There is something about the film itself, the diversity that we really enjoyed.”

The festival has shown films featuring dancers like Misty Copeland and Merce Cunningham in years past.

“Each year we like to choose a different feature film that either resonates with us or we think can showcase the diversity in dance as well as the diversity within types of music that go hand-in-hand with dance,” Chiaramonte said. 

In addition to La Chana, 16 short films will also be shown. The only criteria for the the short films is that they be dance-oriented. 

“The amount of submissions received every year seems to keep expanding,” Chiaramonte said. “This year we received 712 short film submissions from 69 countries — there were a little over 400 submissions last year.” 

A three-person panel is chosen from community members and faculty. This panel and the audience each chooses their favorite films. Then, those films receive a small cash prize for their efforts.

Chiaramonte explained the cash prize is an investment in similar films to be made in the future. 

“The whole goal or idea, in our minds, is to have Flatlands be something that supports filmmakers and artists in that we can be able to give back to them and showcase their talents,” she said. “Not just showing their films and giving them recognition, but giving them a small prize to help their create their next film.”

The festival’s founder, Mark Rhodes, helped create the fest to have more places on campus to view cinema.

“When we started, we were just looking for additional ways to interact with the University and ways to give a space for more films to be shown,” he said. “That’s basically how Flatlands was born.”

Rhodes, who is now assistant director of the festival, has loved watching the event grow over the years and seeing the number of submissions rise.

“The first year was just local filmmakers, and now this year we received submissions from 69 countries worldwide, which is just excellent,” he said. “The amazing thing to me is, each year they score the films, and whether or not they choose the same style of dance to win each year is totally different. Each year the submissions are something totally new.”

Dance students like Lindsey Jennings, senior in FAA, have been part of the festival’s growth. Jennings has been assisting with the festival for three years now and is appreciative of how it brings work from around the world to campus and the community. She has been able to see how each year new talent is “diversifying what types of art we are seeing in the community and changing the ways we can watch and make dance.”

As a senior, Jennings thinks back on why she chose to study dance at the University — because of the “rigor of the program and the breadth of the curriculum that encourages us to seek a unique path in a dance career” — and is proud to assist with the Festival every year to help showcase a “new medium of dance that is not often able to have many resources to an audience.”

Rhodes is happy to see how this festival broadens many viewers’ ideas of how dance can be portrayed in film.

“People come in with a preconception of what a dance film is and always leave with either a new appreciation for dance in film or an appreciation that has just gotten better,” he said.

pevey2@dailyillini.com

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Swift’s ‘Lover’ proves she’s still on top https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/28/swifts-lover-proves-shes-still-on-top/ https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/28/swifts-lover-proves-shes-still-on-top/#respond Wed, 28 Aug 2019 16:00:19 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216003 Thirteen years ago, Taylor Swift introduced herself to the world as a young girl who just wanted her songs on country radio. Now, she’s a successful popstar playing sold-out stadiums with no signs of slowing down.  Her loyal fans, known as “Swifties,” and music fans around the globe have now entered a new era in...

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Thirteen years ago, Taylor Swift introduced herself to the world as a young girl who just wanted her songs on country radio. Now, she’s a successful popstar playing sold-out stadiums with no signs of slowing down. 

Her loyal fans, known as “Swifties,” and music fans around the globe have now entered a new era in the 29-year-old singer’s career. With the Aug. 23 release of her highly anticipated seventh studio album “Lover,” Swift has not only grown as an artist but as a leader in the music industry.

Back in April, Swift released the album’s lead single titled “ME!” featuring Brendon Urie of Panic! at the Disco. The song came along with a music video showing a much happier Swift singing about expressing who you are and not worrying about what anyone else thinks of you.

Her last era, “Reputation,” included multiple images of snakes and the infamous lyric in “Look What You Made Me Do,” where she says, “The old Taylor can’t come to the phone right now, because she’s dead.” Swift showed a never foreseen gloomy side of herself. On this new album, Swift has broken out of that dark shell and stepped into the light again.

With an excellent pop vibe, “Lover” is the album that both Swifties and music fans needed. With a mix of upbeat songs like “Paper Rings,” which touches on a new love obsession and slower tunes like “Cornelia Street,” about an unknown deep life experience, Swift proves once again that her songwriting ability has only grown stronger.

What makes the album pure Swift is the title track, a romantic ballad that tops almost every other love song (and there have been plenty) Swift has written in the past, with the exception of “Ours,” “Love Story” and many other fan favorites. While Swift is still experiencing love and relationships, her songs about those concepts will only grow better from here. 

With the same autobiographical style of writing as her previous records, Swift shows the world with “Lover” she’s not afraid of making music about her personal life experiences, an aspect of her career that has made her so relatable to fans. With outstanding lyrics, smooth melodies and various stories about Swift’s life, “Lover” will no doubt be left on repeat for a long time.

Whether you like or dislike her, Swift is an American icon and proves that accolade with this new album. Maybe someday she will return to her frizzled hair and sparkly guitar country days, but for now, Swifties couldn’t ask for anything less.

Noah is a sophomore in LAS.

noahen2@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/28/swifts-lover-proves-shes-still-on-top/feed/ 0 Copyright by Glenn Francis and Pacific Pro Digital Photography Taylor Swift at the iHeartRadio Music Awards 2019.
Green Street will partially close due to construction https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/28/green-street-will-partially-close-due-construction/ https://dailyillini.com/news/2019/08/28/green-street-will-partially-close-due-construction/#respond Wed, 28 Aug 2019 12:00:21 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216046 A portion of Green Street between Sixth and Wright streets will close to construct a new sanitary sewer main. The sanitary sewer main is required for the new high-rise development, which is located at 708 S. Sixth St. A new manhole will also be added at the intersection of Green and Sixth streets. Intersections between...

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A portion of Green Street between Sixth and Wright streets will close to construct a new sanitary sewer main.

The sanitary sewer main is required for the new high-rise development, which is located at 708 S. Sixth St. A new manhole will also be added at the intersection of Green and Sixth streets.

Intersections between Sixth and Green streets and Fifth and Green streets will remain open. However, eastbound traffic on Green Street must turn south onto Sixth Street instead of continuing straight.

Detours are available for traffic that needs to pass through Green Street. Westbound traffic on Green Street can turn right onto Wright Street and continue straight until Springfield Avenue, where traffic can turn left. Then, continue straight on Springfield Avenue until Fourth Street, where another left turn can be made. Lastly, continue down Fourth Street and until Green Street is reached again, where traffic can turn right and continue on a regular route. 

The construction will begin on Sept. 3 at 7 a.m. and will be completed Sept. 13 at midnight. 

news@dailyillini.com

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Champaign Melee team wins $9k https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/28/champaign-melee-team-wins-9k/ https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/28/champaign-melee-team-wins-9k/#respond Wed, 28 Aug 2019 12:00:18 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=216057 Following a heartbreaking runner-up finish in 2017 and a fourth-place finish in 2018, the Illinois club Melee team won the CSL Smash finals at Shine 2019, defeating Texas A&M University and taking home $9,000 and bragging rights.  Nate “Foxcapacitor” Kranjc helped boost the team to victory after taking down three of the five players on...

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Following a heartbreaking runner-up finish in 2017 and a fourth-place finish in 2018, the Illinois club Melee team won the CSL Smash finals at Shine 2019, defeating Texas A&M University and taking home $9,000 and bragging rights. 

Nate “Foxcapacitor” Kranjc helped boost the team to victory after taking down three of the five players on the A&M team, using Fox as his character. 

Illinois’ five-man team was selected through a power ranking based off of a variety of metrics such as past tournament success and head-to-head victories. Enrique Carvajal, the seventh-ranked Champaign player as of this story and president of Champaign Melee, emphasized the amount of talent the University has. 

“Our best players, those three top players (Lucas “Shabo” Pena, Daniel “Zamu” Bernstein and Louis “PRZ” Kim), they usually do the best out of all of us. They usually make the top 64 or 48 bracket which is a good benchmark of a top tier player,” Carvajal said.

“Foxcapacitor” is ranked fourth as of Tuesday. 

The way CSL (Collegiate Starleague) determines its winners is through crew battles. With a five-man team, each side sends one player to face off against each other. Every player starts out with four “stocks,” or lives. From there, the winner of the first one-on-one must take on the second member of the opposing team, but there’s a catch. Instead of starting out with four stocks again, the winner of the first matchup must fight with the damage and lives they sustained against the first player. 

Despite stipulation and being the final player to enter the battle, “Foxcapacitor” was able to take two stocks from Texas A&M’s “Air”, four stocks from “OrangeOranges”, and another four from “JayWalker”. 

This RSO team has been universally recognized as a powerhouse in Melee for the past few years. Coming into the CSL, Illinois was described as the best team on paper in the competition according to a preview on their official website. 

“These guys are all really good. They’ve developed really nice playstyles and have been able to get wins off of top-100 players,” Carvajal said. 

As these things often do, the Champaign Smash club has become a booming organization that several students flock to every Friday from 6-10 p.m. at the Union to play the game they love.

After winning the Midwest qualifier in Ohio, the team carried its momentum into the regional finals at the Wisconsin Dells to see who would compete at Shine 2019, an up and coming gaming competition. 

As an RSO team, winning $9,000 is a hefty sum for winning a tournament. Although the team is humming along just fine on the financial side, the money will be used to help expand the RSO through more events. 

Looking forward, the team will host a tournament on the weekend of Aug. 30 at the Illini Union Ballroom. This time around, there are no grand prizes available, just a grassroots event for people who simply love the game.

 

@JJKimSports

jjk7@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/sports/2019/08/28/champaign-melee-team-wins-9k/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini Members of the UIUC Super Smash Brothers Melee team, Louis Kim, Lucas Pena, Nate Kranjic, Blake Ball, and Enrique Carvajal, won the Collegiate Star League tournament at Shine 2019 at Worcester MA over the weekend.
ELLNORA Festival brings guitar enthusiasts together https://dailyillini.com/features/2019/08/27/ellnora-festival-brings-guitar-enthusiasts-together/ https://dailyillini.com/features/2019/08/27/ellnora-festival-brings-guitar-enthusiasts-together/#respond Wed, 28 Aug 2019 02:00:52 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=215989 In 2005, the Krannert Center of Performing Arts became home to the Wall to Wall Guitar Festival, which would later be renamed the ELLNORA Guitar Festival. The change came after its successful first two years and is now an internationally-recognized event. The event returned this year and will be held from September 5-7, following its...

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In 2005, the Krannert Center of Performing Arts became home to the Wall to Wall Guitar Festival, which would later be renamed the ELLNORA Guitar Festival. The change came after its successful first two years and is now an internationally-recognized event.

The event returned this year and will be held from September 5-7, following its traditional three-day structure. Since this will be the first ELLNORA Guitar festival since the Krannert Center’s recent 50-year anniversary, this year’s events carry a particular importance.

Bridget Lee-Calfas, the advertising and publicity director of ELLNORA, who also headed the Krannert 50th anniversary’s publicity and marketing front, said the 50th anniversary of Krannert was incredible and built from the ground up in terms of concept and execution.

With the ELLNORA guitar festival, however, they knew a lot more about what they were aiming for heading into the planning process. The guitar festival has come a long way since its original opening in 2005. It started with a basic framework and then built upon that following each year, adding something new but keeping its very core the same.

“It’s a very similar yet strangely unique process actually,” Calfas said. “We always start with the artistry and mission of the center and then think about how we can serve our audiences best each time. From that point, it’s all about the planning process, working through the schedule, determining budget and technical needs, and then coming up with ways to share information and invite our community to come join us.”

Calfas, who had the most fun organizing the opening night, said this year’s festival expands on Krannert’s commitment to presenting guitar-based artistry from around the globe. For this year, they’ve added a number of non-performance events including lectures, panel discussions. a guitar-making demonstration, live podcasts and even contemplative presentations by a spiritual leader followed by live music.

This is also the first time the ELLNORA Opening Night Party has been free and non-ticketed. With incredible teams in events, lighting, audio and house management, the Krannert Center’s team aims to host the 8th iteration of the festival successfully and as grand as ever.

Lavanya Srivastava, sophomore in LAS, has been playing the guitar for over 2 years and eagerly awaits the festivities. Having been raised by her father following some of the greatest guitarists ever including Jimmy Hendrix, Eric Clapton and Bruce Springsteen, she feels a far more intimate and deeper appreciation for guitar-based music.

“It’s not only because my dad raised with classic rock and roll playing on a Sunday afternoon while we did the dishes that I feel so connected and excited for this festival,” she said. “There are so many more new artists popping up every day with new and refreshing music like Ed Sheeran, Niall Horan, Prateek Kuhad and so many more that all in some way or other had a guitar as a part of their journey — and I absolutely love their music. If you look at it, it’s just a piece of wood with six strings on it — and I think that’s beautiful.”

ELLNORA hosts many Grammy Award winners, Billboard Top 100 artists and even Rock and Roll Hall of Fame members. However, it still manages to host and promote relatively small-time artists, too.

With around 25 performances currently scheduled for the event, almost half will be free with the intention to remove the ideology that high-end music performances cannot be for the masses, so everyone can truly enjoy the spirit of music.

Srivastava said it takes special skills from the artist and their performance to give people a reason to come together and forget their differences and problems. She emphasized the impact seeing a person live in concert can have, saying while having just a regular MP3 play from a speaker is one thing, having an actual person or band standing on a stage, gripping their guitar and inspiring emotion shared among their entire audience while having a unique meaning to every individual really is an extraordinary and unique experience.

“Music brings people together,” Srivastava said. “It’s really one of those few things that can be enjoyed by anyone.”

rjammu2@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/features/2019/08/27/ellnora-festival-brings-guitar-enthusiasts-together/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini Samantha Fish performs opening night on Sept. 14, 2017 at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts during ELLNORA Guitar Festival.
Technology kills our imagination https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/27/tech-kills-imagination/ https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/27/tech-kills-imagination/#respond Wed, 28 Aug 2019 01:59:51 +0000 https://dailyillini.com/?p=215868 I had a weird summer. I babysat/teenage-sat (I hereby declare “teenage-sat” a word) an 11-year-old and a 15-year-old. I learned many a lesson from my quirky summer job. The most important of all the lessons, however, was to not give your kid an iPad. Seriously. The imagination of a child is a wonderful thing. I...

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I had a weird summer. I babysat/teenage-sat (I hereby declare “teenage-sat” a word) an 11-year-old and a 15-year-old. I learned many a lesson from my quirky summer job. The most important of all the lessons, however, was to not give your kid an iPad. Seriously.

The imagination of a child is a wonderful thing. I remember my neighbor and I made a fort out of a large bush in her backyard when we were 11; we fashioned “thrones” out of flagstones, “cooked” with the berries on a bush and used water from the creek. It was a blast and a half. 

Today’s 11-year-olds don’t want to play make believe. They want to watch vloggers on YouTube or make some slime. But, that’s about it.

Technology is undeniably a huge part of our lives these days, even for kids. But I worry how this boundless technology will affect future generations.

I’m 20, I’m not a parent, but I have a bit of parenting advice to throw out there: Let your kids be bored.

Being bored is a wonderful thing. Boredom forces you to think creatively, to find something to do with whatever is around the house, to fool around and pretend and play and just be a kid.

Boredom, I would even venture to say, creates smarter, more creative individuals. What are the chances a kid will tinker around with the innards of a radio when he has an iPad? What are the chances a kid will make a log cabin out of popsicle sticks and fabric glue when the TV is always on?

If we want the next generation to be composed of engineers, artists, writers and teachers, we need to keep kids off of iPads. Throw the devices in a lake. Smash them with a hammer. Or, better yet, don’t give your kid one in the first place. 

When I was 11, I read voraciously. The summer before sixth grade, I was bored, so I decided to see how quickly I could read the Harry Potter series in its entirety. It took me 17 days. 

If I had an iPad, I wouldn’t have been bored. And I definitely wouldn’t have read seven books in less than three weeks. 

Let’s turn the tables a little bit. If you had a choice, would you watch Netflix, or would you read a book? 

Not only do we need to limit our children’s exposure to technology, but we need to limit our own screen time as well. If your kid can’t spend time on the family tablet, you shouldn’t watch the latest episode of “The Handmaid’s Tale,” either. 

Tech-free time should be a family affair. I think all our imaginations could use a little TLC.

Ellen is a junior in LAS.

ellenmb2@dailyillini.com

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https://dailyillini.com/opinions/2019/08/27/tech-kills-imagination/feed/ 0 The Daily Illini A child plays a video game on a tablet. Columnist Ellen urges parents to allow their children to be bored and, thus, cultivate their imagination rather than drown them in technology.